Two Rights Make a Wrong

People say you shouldn’t quit if the game is good. That seems like good advice.

And people say you should play in good games.

That makes sense too. But if you put those two pieces of advice together — that is, if I only play in good games, and I don’t quit good games — then I would never quit.

3 Comments

  • Kien Hua Posted May 24, 2008 12:29 am

    On one of the 2plus2 pokercasts, Barry Greenstein noted that the high-stakes no-limit games he played in are drying up. Online, I have noticed that the games are getting tougher. I understand that poker goes through cycles. When do you think the games are going to get softer and more available? Can you elaborate on all stakes from micro-limit to high-stakes?

    Thanks Tommy. You the man!

  • tommy Posted May 24, 2008 10:53 am

    Hi Kien,

    “When do you think the games are going to get softer and more available? Can you elaborate on all stakes from micro-limit to high-stakes?”

    Traditionally, when a new player pool opens up, it starts out soft and gets gradually tougher. This happens on every scale, whether it’s a three-table brick-and-mortar casino, or a continental internet poker surge. So in a sense, games are always getting tougher, except when there are gushes of new players and availability. No one knows what the future will bring. That’s why I think it’s a really good idea to play your best today. 🙂

    Tommy

  • david encoh Posted June 24, 2008 2:18 pm

    This assumes that a game is not a dynamic entity wherein your skill level relative to your opponents is constantly changing. I know this book a guy wrote where he talks quite a bit about people’s changing ability levels over time. A player was telling me recently about a game where he cashed out nine racks after a tortuous 36 hour session. He told me that he had to quit when he saw horns growing out of his neighbors head. Sounds like a pretty good stop-loss to me.

    david aka potmo

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